The Next Emperor?

Even the Middle Kingdom is no match for one small sniffer dog when he’s in the mood!

LibertyGibbert’s grand master of mirth, Fenbeagle, this week aims his pencil at an oft-forgotten but oddly familiar chapter in Chinese history…

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105 Responses to The Next Emperor?

  1. Pointman says:

    Nice graphics. Losing one’s self in the popular collective, being one with the great leap forward. That’s for programmed ants.

    Pointman

  2. Edward. says:

    Fen,

    “Show’s missing summat.”

    Send in the clowns.

    Ed.

  3. Pointman says:

    Edward. says:
    August 27, 2010 at 9:17 am

    Pointman

  4. Locusts says:

    Hahahaha! Fantastic Mr. Fen!

  5. Amanda says:

    Fen, love the perspective. Is that Fenbeagle sitting atop the Great Folly of China? Great stuff!

  6. NoIdea says:

    Fenbeagle

    Superb!

    NI

  7. mlpinaus says:

    Brilliant. The scope, depth and range of talent and knowledge on this blog is astounding. Thanks….
    Marcus

  8. Amerloque says:

    Wonderful job, Fen ! Breakfast coffee and croissant were mightily improved !

    Amerloque 20100827 09h00 Paris time (CET)

  9. Amerloque says:

    Good morning, everyone !

    In res: rephrasing fun, troll (from previous thread)

    Original:

    “If you anonymise the data there is no way of telling (good) from (bad) sitings because they all show virtually the same trend.
    Therefore the siting issues have no significant influence on the measured trend.”

    can become:

    “If you anonymise the data there is no way of telling (honest) from (dishonest) sitings because they all show virtually the same trend.
    Therefore the siting issues have no significant influence on the measured trend.”

    Ah, yes …

    In finance …

    “If you anonymise the data there is no way of telling (honest) from (dishonest) [sitings] because they all show virtually the same trend.
    Therefore the [siting issues] have no significant influence on the measured trend.”

    can become:

    “If you anonymise the data there is no way of telling (honest) from (dishonest) [financial operations] because they all show virtually the same trend.
    Therefore the [financial operations] issues have no significant influence on the measured trend.”

    Right. (sigh)

    Is this post-normal finance ?

    Best,
    L’Amerloque

    Amerloque 20100827 09h30 Paris time (CET)

  10. meltemian says:

    Ah Fen, now I see why you were “missing” the other day. Brilliant stuff!!

    Morning All.

    Pointman – loved all the chapters, it took me all yesterday, in between doing all the usual boring stuff, to read them. Can’t wait for the next one!

  11. manonthemoor says:

    Well done Fen, a true pleasure to see your work.

    The graphics and the text demonstrate, a great skill which brings mirth to the stupidity of AGW and its folly.

    Your work adds to this site a great personality, which is not easily matched by others.

    Thank you

  12. realityreturns says:

    This comment was removed by the mad moderator on JD’s blog:

    Yaakov, Yaossx, Bufo, Fen and guysThere was a concerted troll attack last evening. I think the aphid is now flipping 24 hours a day but two other trolls rumjumjim and kibitzer were on the loose too. I didn’t spot free willy though.The point I am making is, what has poked the nest? Why are they so afraid of us again? Is even the Guardian becoming uncomfortable for their antics?It seems that desperation abounds in the moonbat nest!

  13. dirlada says:

    Fantastic Mr Fenbeagle!

  14. Pointman says:

    meltemian says:
    August 27, 2010 at 6:10 pm

    Glad you enjoyed it.

    Pointman

  15. Pointman says:

    For those of you who may not know of him, meet James Corbett, a clear thinker who can articulate his ideas. He’s always been ahead of the game.

    Pointman

  16. Pointman says:

    Now you know their history, have a look at their touchy feely current offerings but remember the death and misery they brought to so many human beings.

    The Galton Institute – http://www.galtoninstitute.org.uk/

    The Population Council – http://www.popcouncil.org/

    Pointman

  17. Dr. Dave says:

    G’day ya’ll,

    Enjoy….

  18. Dave, Edinburgh says:

    Fantastic Fen, Thank you for bringing brightness to a rather dull day

    Dave,E

  19. Amerloque says:

    Hello Everyone !

    I have just left the following message on JD’s latest blog.

    x x x x x

    To whom it may concern:

    Today, August 27, 2010, many of my messages in this thread have been removed by “moderators”.

    It should be made clear that two of these messages were ones that I have been posting irregularly since last year, before Copenhagen, and are simple, polite calls to action: “Now is not the time to let up.”

    In no way can they be considered ‘insults’, or ‘spam’ or ‘disturbing’ posts. All of them are in full compliance with DT blog guidelines.

    When other posters attempted to rectify the situation by reposting the message(s), those posts were removed as well.

    Since I have neither the time nor the desire to “complain” to the so-called “moderators” or to their supervisors, I have decided to forward all this to my UK solicitor, who is paid to write letters to people quite a bit higher on corporate ladders. This course of action has been quite worthwhile in many fields over the past four decades.

    Needless to say, I – nor any institutions or groups of which I am a current or former member – will probably not be purchasing from DT advertisers in future.

    Best to All !
    L’Amerloque
    Amerloque 20100827 16h30 Paris time (CET)
    http://amerloqueparis.blogspot.com/

    x x x x x

    Best,
    L’Amerloque

  20. Amerloque says:

    Hello Pointman !

    In the LA Times today …

    “Protection sought for San Bernardino flying squirrel

    Environmentalists want the nocturnal glider native to Southern California mountains to be listed as an endangered species threatened by climate change.
    Environmentalists have petitioned the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to list the San Bernardino flying squirrel, a nocturnal glider native to Southern California mountains, as an endangered species threatened by climate change.

    The petition, filed Tuesday by the Tucson-based Center for Biological Diversity, is another salvo in the nascent effort to combat global warming through the Endangered Species Act.
    …/… ”

    http://tinyurl.com/2wmdaov

    If some of these squirrels are imported to Oz, they’ll undoubtedly find the ecology of Pilbarra to their liking. Are there any beasties which could mate with them ?

    Help take a load off Annie !

    Save Pilbarra !

    Best,
    L’Amerloque
    Amerloque 20100827 18h30 Paris time (CET)
    http://amerloqueparis.blogspot.com/

  21. Amerloque says:

    The post below has been removed from the DT blog — twice !

    xxxxx
    Hi Cap’n !

    Are we sure that moderators are not being paid to act irrationally, so as to increase hits that the DT can show to its advertisers to increase billings ?

    Best,
    L’Amerloque
    xxxxx

  22. Scud1 says:

    Brilliant stuff Fen!

  23. fenbeagle says:

    Cheap flights? ……only 50p

  24. manonthemoor says:

    It seems after the JD holiday marathon with over 3000 hits that the moderators are back with a vengeance.

    Anything to do with the Barclay Bros or advertisers seems to be beyond the pale

    amerloque seems to have the knack of upsetting them and captain sherlock as well.

    Just picked this off the pile before it got deleted.

    amerloque
    just now
    Hi L !

    /// You don’t mean to say they might be corrupt?

    I asked bje the very same question, and I think his answer was “impossible”. ///

    “Corruption” is one of those words that bring a gleam to law enforcers’ and lawyers’ eyes. (grin) They begin filling in warrants and subpoenas, both figuratively and literally. (wider grin)

    One might infer that with such employees, the company finds it far easier and more rewarding to focus on the finance rather than the science, preferring to leave interpretation of the latter data to recognized – and sometimes self-anointed – “experts”.

    We rejectionists have seen and demonstrated and commented on just how weak many of the AGW theses, arguments, conclusions and extrapolations are.

    Perhaps corruption – if there is any, indeed – is not the correct locution: how about “intellectual honesty”, for starters ?

    This “bje” individual eerily reminds Amerloque of the “Eliza” program so popular several decades ago. (grin)

    Alors, when is a Locusts’ paper on the current Chinese “Falung Gong” and the Tai’Ping Rebellion, of Chinese historical memory, for the somewhat brainwashed Westerners who believe in “Universal Human Rights” ? (wide grin)

    Best,
    L’Amerloque

    Amerloque 20100827 20h30 Paris time (CET)
    http://amerloqueparis.blogspot.com/

  25. suffolkboy says:

    A bit dated, but I was reminded of the outcome of this case from last year before the UK Employment Appeal Tribunal :

    A belief in man-made climate change, and the alleged resulting moral imperatives, is capable, if genuinely held, of being a philosophical belief for the purpose of the 2003 Religion and Belief Regulations.

    http://www.bailii.org/uk/cases/UKEAT/2009/0219_09_0311.html

    However, the case never went to a hearing because it was settled out of court.

  26. Locusts says:

    Manonthemoor

    Thanks for saving that reply!

    Amerloque,

    A lot of my favourite websites about the former seem to have been scrubbed recently. I need to jot down as much info as I can, lest I forget. Any Locusts’ paper may only appear in story format featuring rabbits and mice and moles and foxes and horses and pigs!

  27. Locusts says:

    Interesting post grabbed and saved for relative posterity:

    catweazle
    1 hour ago
    Your Name
    14 hours ago

    “James? Why are people disillusioned with “scientists”? It’s because “science” is so unscientific.”

    “Real” scientists have become an endangered species.

    What we have now is “Post-Normal” scientists.

    Here are some examples, courtesy of Mike Hulme, founding director of the Tyndall Centre, and Professor of Climate Change at the University of East Anglia (UEA), prepared climate scenarios and reports for the UK Government (including the UKCIP98 and UKCIP02 scenarios, and reviewer for UKCP09), the European Commission, UNEP, UNDP, WWF-International and the IPCC, and was co-ordinating Lead Author for the chapter on ‘Climate scenario development’ for the Third Assessment Report of the IPCC, as well as a contributing author for several other chapters.

    Enjoy!

    ” The danger of a “normal” reading of science is that it assumes science can first find truth, then speak truth to power, and that truth-based policy will then follow…exchanges often reduce to ones about scientific truth rather than about values, perspectives and political preferences.

    …‘self-evidently’ dangerous climate change will not emerge from a normal scientific process of truth-seeking…scientists – and politicians – must trade truth for influence. What matters about climate change is not whether we can predict the future with some desired level of certainty and accuracy.

    Climate change is telling the story of an idea and how that idea is changing the way in which our societies think, feel, interpret and act. And therefore climate change is extending itself well beyond simply the description of change in physical properties in our world…

    The function of climate change I suggest, is not as a lower-case environmental phenomenon to be solved…It really is not about stopping climate chaos. Instead, we need to see how we can use the idea of climate change – the matrix of ecological functions, power relationships, cultural discourses and materials flows that climate change reveals – to rethink how we take forward our political, social, economic and personal projects over the decades to come.

    There is something about this idea that makes it very powerful for lots of different interest groups to latch on to, whether for political reasons, for commercial interests, social interests in the case of NGOs, and a whole lot of new social movements looking for counter culture trends.

    Climate change has moved from being a predominantly physical phenomenon to being a social one…It is circulating anxiously in the worlds of domestic politics and international diplomacy, and with mobilising force in business, law, academia, development, welfare, religion, ethics, art and celebrity.

    Climate change also teaches us to rethink what we really want for ourselves…mythical ways of thinking about climate change reflect back to us truths about the human condition…

    The idea of climate change should be seen as an intellectual resource around which our collective and personal identifies and projects can form and take shape. We need to ask not what we can do for climate change, but to ask what climate change can do for us…Because the idea of climate change is so plastic, it can be deployed across many of our human projects and can serve many of our psychological, ethical, and spiritual needs.

    …climate change has become an idea that now travels well beyond its origins in the natural sciences…climate change takes on new meanings and serves new purposes…climate change has become “the mother of all issues”, the key narrative within which all environmental politics – from global to local – is now framed…Rather than asking “how do we solve climate change?” we need to turn the question around and ask: “how does the idea of climate change alter the way we arrive at and achieve our personal aspirations…?”

    We need to reveal the creative psychological, spiritual and ethical work that climate change can do and is doing for us…we open up a way of resituating culture and the human spirit…As a resource of the imagination, the idea of climate change can be deployed around our geographical, social and virtual worlds in creative ways…it can inspire new artistic creations in visual, written and dramatised media. The idea of climate change can provoke new ethical and theological thinking about our relationship with the future….We will continue to create and tell new stories about climate change and mobilise these stories in support of our projects. Whereas a modernist reading of climate may once have regarded it as merely a physical condition for human action, we must now come to terms with climate change operating simultaneously as an overlying, but more fluid, imaginative condition of human existence.”

    Link: http://buythetruth.wordpress.com/2009/10/31/cli

    There you have it. Straight from the horse’s mouth.

    The function of climate change I suggest, is not as a lower-case environmental phenomenon to be solved…It really is not about stopping climate chaos

    ……..

    We will continue to create and tell new stories about climate change and mobilise these stories in support of our projects

  28. Old Toad says:

    Locusts, agreed. We all know the English east coast has been subject to erosion for ages, yet on ‘Farming Today’ the lady interviewing a local farmer added the words ‘and Climate Change’ to everything she said.
    Because of BBC bias, and repeated propaganda, folk are already conditioned to assume ‘ah, that would be ‘man’ then, with his evil coal-fired power stations’ .

  29. Pointman says:

    In Alaska, Doubts About Climate Change Rise With a New Politician

    “Alaska’s cliffhanger primary is poised to propel a climate skeptic toward the U.S. Senate, observers say, likely bolstering the number of nominations achieved by conservative candidates who challenge manmade global warming.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/cwire/2010/08/26/26climatewire-in-alaska-doubts-about-climate-change-rise-w-72310.html

    The GOP are realising a skeptic stance will get them elected. In a close race, it will pick up the skeptic vote.

    Pointman

  30. Amerloque says:

    Hello manonthemoor !
    on August 28, 2010 at 5:59 am

    Many thanks for saving and posting my reply. The Cap’n original post has been banished to cyberneverland …

    Best,
    L’Amerloque
    Amerloque 20100828 12h30 Paris time (CET)
    http://amerloqueparis.blogspot.com/

  31. Amerloque says:

    Hello Locusts !
    on August 28, 2010 at 12:23 pm

    ///A lot of my favourite websites about the former seem to have been scrubbed recently. I need to jot down as much info as I can, lest I forget.///

    (grin) Well, break out the brushes and inks – you’ll be able to practice your calligraphy ! (wide grin) (er … “Calligraphical jotting ” ?!) (wider grin)

    /// Any Locusts’ paper may only appear in story format featuring rabbits and mice and moles and foxes and horses and pigs!///

    The vast majority of the stuff Amerloque has read is of contemporaneous missionary origin: it’d be interesting indeed to hear how Old Friends todfay feel about the events and what bearing – if any – they have on current thinking.

    Best,
    L’Amerloque
    Amerloque 20100827 12h45 Paris time (CET)
    http://amerloqueparis.blogspot.com/

  32. Amerloque says:

    Hello Everyone !

    In the LA Times today (Saturday morning) …

    “Protection sought for San Bernardino flying squirrel

    Environmentalists want the nocturnal glider native to Southern California mountains to be listed as an endangered species threatened by climate change.

    Environmentalists have petitioned the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to list the San Bernardino flying squirrel, a nocturnal glider native to Southern California mountains, as an endangered species threatened by climate change.

    The petition, filed Tuesday by the Tucson-based Center for Biological Diversity, is another salvo in the nascent effort to combat global warming through the Endangered Species Act.
    …/… ”

    http://tinyurl.com/2wmdaov

    If some of these squirrels are imported to Oz, they’ll undoubtedly find the ecology of Pilbarra to their liking. Are there any beasties which could mate with them ?

    Help take a load off Annie !

    Save Pilbarra !

    Best,
    L’Amerloque
    Amerloque 20100827 18h30 Paris time (CET)
    http://amerloqueparis.blogspot.com/

  33. suffolkboy says:

    Old Toad said: August 28, 2010 at 5:56 pm

    the lady interviewing a local farmer added the words ‘and Climate Change’ to everything she said

    What a fantastic post!
    The programme is at http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b00th8x6/Farming_Today_Farming_Today_This_Week/ (I am unclear if non-UK people can get it).

    The farmers never mention climate change or sea-level rise: they are more concerned about coastal erosion (which has been going of for centuries), salt-blasting crops grown near the sea, cows drinking sea-water, and freshwater fish not liking sea-water). All the climate change and sea-level comment comes from the presenter. What on earth was her producer doing?
    The references are at 02:30, 15:34, 20:21, 21:41, 22:37 and 23:05.

    I particularly like the comment at 21:41 about using wind turbines for a limited period of time” (I thought at first she meant using the turbines to lower the North Sea, but she goes to explain how the turbines will raise money[how?] to look after other patches affected by coastal erosion.) Additionally, there was the interview with Nicola[sp?] Curry of the Country Land and Business Association[1,2] (not of course to be confused with Sir Don Curry, of the Policy Commission for the Future of Food and Farming[3], which is presumably a UK government quango) whose contribution was loaded with all the latest government-speak: communities, public/private partnership, solutions, challenges.
    [1] CLA on sea level change: http://www.cla.org.uk/News_and_Press/Latest_Releases/Coastal_Management/Sea_Defence/1004142.htm/
    [2] CLA declaration on carbon trading by using trees and soil as offsets: http://www.cla.org.uk/Policy_Work/Climate_Change/
    [3] http://archive.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/farming/pdf/condoc2.pdf

  34. Old Toad says:

    Suffolkboy. Thanks for that. Wasn’t sure I was dreaming when she mentioned windfarms. Presumably a continuous line of them down the east coast, with deep concrete bases rising to 10 foot above the ground, would solve the problem of erosion.

  35. criticalThinker says:

    Climate change is boring, boring boring. Get a life people!
    ….we’ll have to burn warmists to keep ourselves warm.

    http://eureferendum.blogspot.com/2010/08/antarctic-cold-snap-climate-change-yay.html

  36. criticalThinker says:

    fenbeagle says:
    August 28, 2010 at 5:50 am

    Feckin great!!

  37. criticalThinker says:

    Pointman says:
    August 27, 2010 at 11:42 pm

    Interesting link Pointman, I hadn’t thought of AGW in terms of eugenics before but it does seem to fit. The policies spawned by AGW are so inhumane. More of the same here… http://co2insanity.com/2010/08/27/will-carbon-credits-create-food-shortages/

  38. CriticalThinker says:

    Fox News – “The Green Swindle”
    The truth behind the billion dollar industry!

    http://vodpod.com/watch/4325030-the-green-swindle-video-foxnews-com

  39. manonthemoor says:

    FOR MSHER ————– Cloudman posts

    • “If you talk to them privately they’re scared stiff of the fact that they don’t really know what the clouds and the aerosols are doing.”
    Now where have you heard that before? 🙂
    Have I missed anything else while the day job has been keeping me busy?

    cloudman on Mar 31st, 2010 at 8:55 am
    • ozboy
    I think you’re looking for cloudman who hasn’t been on the blog for a while. He is a cloud physicist, the ultimate cloud expert. I wish he was still posting and explaning about clouds. (I’m writing this because I hope he still reads and will come back and post again.)

    msher1 on Mar 18th, 2010 at 9:32 am

    • This repetition of the ’settled science’ rubbish really annoys me. Who the hell do they think they are kidding. Sadly I was never very optimistic that the enquiry would be anything but a whitewash – they usually are.
    As a dyed in the wool Brit it pains me to say it but I now believe it will be up to the Americans to officially unmask the AGW axis (it’s already well blown in the blogsphere – thanks JD).
    My gut feeling is it will need a change of US administration for it to happen even over there but I would really like the view of some Americans on that.

    cloudman on Feb 12th, 2010 at 6:19 pm

    • Gosh – she has a BSc – are we all supposed to stand around in total awe. My tutor told me that a BSc was quite a reasonable if slightly cursory introduction to a subject worthy only of collection in absentia – he really knew how to build his students up.
    As a sceptical (and thus thoroughly untrustworthy) former atmospheric scientist I suppose I should declare that I still have a USS pension coming my way (I hate to think what that is invested in). My private pension can be discounted because it was with Equitable Life followed by HBOS (don’t hurt yourselves laughing).
    I have been in the pay of a big oil company – I used to get change from a 50 quid note after filling my car at an Esso station but not recently, obviously.
    With my pension in mind perhaps I should change sides as, with about 20 acres of tatty pasture I find that, thanks to the government’s green stupidity, if I turn my grass into pellets and burn them in a Stirling engine generator the government will pay me silly sums per kW.hr for biomass generated electricity (even if I use it myself).
    So guys, maybe this Jones chap has a point…

    cloudman on Feb 10th, 2010 at 6:02 pm

    You seem to have a very low opinion of the scientific argument against the theory that man is causing dangerous levels of global warming. Perhaps you would like to look at the output of just three scientists; Roy Spencer, Warwick Hughes, and Bob Carter. All three explain very well what their issues with the IPCC are.
    • Here are some links:-
    http://www.drroyspencer.com/
    http://www.warwickhughes.com/blog/
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOLkze-9GcI
    • The last, to a talk given by Bob Carter in 2007, is especially well done.

    • cloudman on Feb 8th, 2010 at 6:03 pm



    • I’m no expert on American politics but it seems to me the current administration bought so heavily into the AGW thing – possibly swung the election on it with the help of Al Gore using it – so they can hardly turn around on the whole thing and retain much credibility. My guess is that it will take until the next Republican administration before any AGW forgers get to feel the heat.
    Unfortunately in the UK we only have UKIP that haven’t got themselves embarrassingly deep into the AGW bed so I’m not holding my breath waiting to see Phil Jones head on a spike.
    I reckon the best we can hope for is that the politicos, who must now know the real score over AGW, will sideline the whole thing as fast as they can without looking silly (or more silly than normal).

    cloudman on Feb 4th, 2010 at 9:25 am

    • Geoffrey – Although there are some that have misinterpreted the significance of the ‘hide the decline’ email I think you will find that the reputable sceptics identified the correct interpretation early on in the climategate discussion. That some ‘got the wrong end of the stick’ does not however legitimise what really lies behind the email. Hiding this feature of the proxy data avoided embarrassing questions being asked about the validity of the whole proxy data set – if it’s no good in one era why should we trust it in others?
    If you are really interested in getting a balanced view of the AGW argument perhaps you should look at what Bob Carter says in this set of 4 youtube clips:-

    and discuss his points with some of the pro-AGW scientists you know. Perhaps you will then agree with me that the “settled science ” tag is completely inappropriate in the field of climatology.

    cloudman on Feb 2nd, 2010 at 2:17 pm

    • @lancecorp
    Regarding the ocean acidification thing I think the warmists are going to have even more trouble making a case around this than about temperature changes.
    The change in pH of the oceans since the industrial revolution is from 8.18 to 8.10. However, this change is minuscule compared to the temporal and spacial variability of oceanic pH. So the change in pH is more of a theoretically calculated expectation than an actual observation.

    cloudman on Jan 26th, 2010 at 6:28 pm

    • @cloudman I’d be interested to hear your thoughts on this http://scienceblogs.com/deltoid/2009/12/russian_analysis_confirms_20th.php. Someone forwarded it to me today. A warmist has done some analysis on the data and found that in this case the “cherry-picking” doesn’t make a significant amount of difference – the trend being the same.

    James Delingpole on Jan 7th, 2010 at 9:38 am

    • Hi James – Thanks for the link. At first sight it looks rather like the story that emerges from Warwick Hughes view of what Jones did with the Australian data – to pick stations and to truncate data from other stations, etc to depress the apparent temperature of the earlier years in the record. Much the same is also suggested for the New Zealand data where an uncorrected plot of the raw data gives a trend of only 0.06degC/century rise while the result given after a CRU associated scientist had made corrections for instrumental and site changes is over 0.9 degC/century.
    I have to say that it is interesting that in all cases the CRU analysis of the data comes up with a greater rate of rise in temperature in the 20th century than any other. It looks more like someone trying to arrive at a “worst case” value than a “best estimate” which, of course, is legitimate if you are open about this. To paraphrase what Roy Spencer seems to be saying he is prepared to accept that the IPCC might just be right but that what they are putting forward is a worst case scenario.

    cloudman on Jan 7th, 2010 at 10:32 am
    • James – Just to add to what I said earlier, looking at the Russian analysis again it looks as if the Jones et al overestimate of the warming could be about 0.2C over the last 100 years. It’s worth remembering that we are only talking about a suggested global average rise of about 0.6C/century so a 30% overestimate is not a trivial matter – indeed it could be critical.
    If it were to turn out that a similar overestimate had occurred throughout the data and that the real global rise over the 20th century was only 0.4C and that perhaps even as little as 0.1C of that rise were not due to CO2 concentration changes (but due to, say the phases of the known climatic cycles such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation) then the case for CO2 restrain becomes very thin indeed.

    cloudman on Jan 7th, 2010 at 12:56 pm

    • Should the BBC be quoting the temperature ranking of 2009 at all at the moment? After all, they will be doing so on the basis of the HadCRUT temperature data set which must be suspect in the light of Climategate, what the Russians are saying about the way their data was cherry-picked, what is now being said of the way the New Zealand data was ‘adjusted’ and what Warwick Hughes has been saying for years about the way Jones treated the Australian data (see:- http://www.warwickhughes.com/blog/?p=317 ).
    Oh, and if you have the time James have a look at what has been done to the ice-core data (here:- http://www.warwickhughes.com/icecore/IceCoreSprg97.pdf
    ) – It makes Mann’s treatment of tree-ring data look positively light-handed!

    cloudman on Jan 7th, 2010 at 9:21 am

    • Duckham
    It seems to me that you are arguing that climategate is a non-issue because we have to develop renewable energy sources anyway and that it does not matter if AGW is all rubbish as it provides a convenient mechanism for the politicians to herd us all in the direction we have to go.
    I think that overlooks two major issues. Firstly, scientists need to be utterly honest if the public are to have faith in the warnings that scientists raise. If AGW proves to have been a deliberate exaggeration why will anyone believe us when some real threat looms?
    Secondly there is the question of our short-term response in reducing CO2 emissions ahead of developing viable large-scale, long-term renewable resources. Moving 15% of the World’s most productive agricultural land to fuel production and the resulting rise in global food prices has meant that our response to the AGW theory has already cost lives amongst the poorest in the World – lives that might have been spared.
    If climategate is the work of a whistle-blower perhaps he simply developed a conscience about that.

    cloudman on Jan 3rd, 2010 at 12:06 pm

    • msher1
    Thanks for the interest. Yes, my first degree was in physics and my PhD is in cloud physics – a very narrow field and so small back in the 70’s that most of my colleagues can probably guess who I am from what I have already said. I consider cloud physics to be quite distinct from climatology. The hope of cloud physics is, in my view, to provide a solid physical understanding of cloud processes and that this would eventually feed into forecasting and long-term climatology.
    I should perhaps add that the instrumental problems of cloud physics are considerable – even things which we consider basic measurements – cloud droplet size spectra, liquid water content values and cloud condensation nucleus spectra are not possible to the accuracy we really require and, of course, we have little historical data.

    cloudman on Jan 2nd, 2010 at 7:31 pm

    • burgess
    Sorry not to get back to you before – looks as if I missed a good party here last night
    I have always kept an open mind about the cosmic ray stuff. I’m not entirely convinced that the ionising events directly nucleating droplets is the mechanism (one can in very still conditions in remote, clean air situations get supersaturated regions established over pools and ponds where the condensation nuclei have become depleted and if cosmic rays were providing a constant stream of nucleating events I’m not sure this would happen) however, I would be interested to know if the aerosol CCN might become modified by the action of cosmic rays which would provide a different, less direct way for them to affect clouds but like everything in cloud physics it would be experimentally difficult to investigate.
    Roy Spencer did an interesting piece looking at the CERES reflected sunlight data and the geomagnetic Ap index and as he says the results are “at least a little intriguing”.
    Have a look at Roy’s analysis at:-
    http://www.drroyspencer.com/category/blogarticle/
    Of course, very small changes to the coverage, persistence or optical properties of clouds could easily have an influence on global temperature as large as CO2 changes. John Latham and his collaborators have done some interesting work on albedo enhancement of marine stratocu for warming mitigation which shows, in principle, just how small the changes in clouds need to be to have substantial effect on global temperature. See:-
    http://www.mmm.ucar.edu/people/latham/

    cloudman on Jan 3rd, 2010 at 10:43 am
    • As someone who spent from the mid ’70s to the mid ’90s in cloud physics research I have to say that the idea that AGW is ’settled science’ is a joke. For those that haven’t already heard, the effect of clouds on the radiative balance of the Earth is huge – way bigger than the effect of CO2. Unfortunately, cloud physics is anything but settled science – in fact it struggles to get much beyond being qualitative in many areas and is massively short of the accurate quantitative understanding needed to justify the idea the AGW is beyond reasonable question.
    As an example, my own research was simply into what happens in the bottom 100m of a cumulus cloud – the ‘nursery slopes’ of cloud physics – and I’m sorry to say that, along with everyone else in the field, I got almost nowhere in 20 years and it’s not much better now.

    cloudman on Jan 2nd, 2010 at 6:02 pm

    ================================================
    These entries comprise the majority of cloudman posts.

  40. manonthemoor says:

    Interesting downloadable .pdf here with regard to IPCC mischief

    Quoted by ravenscar on JD

    http://scienceandpublicpolicy.org/originals/we_have_been_conned.html

  41. scud1 says:

    Like it MOTM…

    “The IPCC is a disgrace to science. In its desire to fit the square peg of science into the round hole of politics it has abandoned the “scientific method” and replaced it with a desperate search for data and other material that might support a specific hypothesis.”

    Ha ha!…Good weekend everyone.

  42. Locusts says:

    m,

    Thanks for putting Cloudman’s posts up.

  43. Locusts says:

    Greenpeace are much better at photoshop than me.

    But such assurances do little to comfort campaign groups such as Greenpeace. “These waters, like all Arctic waters, are incredibly dangerous,” said Ayliffe last week. “They have to have ships on standby to push away icebergs or fire water cannons to deflect them.

    Does anybody fancy giving Greenpeace a call to find out out at what size icebergs become dangerous to oil rigs, and what size water canons are appropriate for the re-routing of what size icebergs. I would also be very interested in finding out if this is standard practice in all extended period polar operations.

    Ships that push icebergs away… Ships have moved on a bit since the Titanic’s maiden voyage it seems.

    Fenbeagle, I can see a cartoon in here somewhere.

  44. suffolkboy says:

    From Professor Mike Hulme’s keynote lecture[1] to the Royal Geographical Society on Thursday 2nd Sep 2010. In a keynote lecture to the Royal Geographical Society Annual conference this week he will call for a dramatic changes to the way the IPCC operates.

    “The IPCC has not sufficiently adapted to the changing science and politics of climate change, nor to the changing expected and demanded role of science and expertise in society.
    “The IPCC’s approach of seeking consensus obscures and constricts both scientific and wider social debates about both knowledge-driven and value-driven uncertainties that surround climate change politics.”

    [1] http://www.rgs.org/NR/rdonlyres/2FDAE98D-7D62-448F-B3AC-DC7D68F11FF9/0/AC2010ProgrammeBookv7lowres.pdf

    Source:
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/environment/climatechange/7969460/UN-climate-change-panel-to-be-warned-over-reports.html

  45. Amerloque says:

    Hi Everyone !

    Posted to the DT blog(s) this morning (Sunday):

    x x x x x

    Hello !

    Quite a bit of the CAGW leftist “thinking” – and attendant propaganda – emanates from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), via forums and allegedly independent lecture programs organized by the school. Many of these lectures are supposedly simple platforms for outside speakers to “inform” and “debate”.

    Unfortunately, in Amerloque’s view, the choice of topics is heavily one-sided: no prizes, naturally, for guessing which side ! (grin)

    One particular topic that buttresses the entire CAGW scam is “environmental justice”. Posters who have a bit of time on their hands might think about a lengthy visit to the LSE site:

    http://tinyurl.com/23tzpu

    where a plethora of podcasts is available.

    Of course, “deniers” and “skeptics” figure as prominent targets in some “independent” lectures, which enable the attentive listener to draw up a list of the most fanatic and politicized warmists, who simply do not appear to master the science, but rather the Marxist dialectic – since that, indeed, is their stock in trade. (wider grin )

    Now is not the time to let up !

    Best,
    L”Amerloque

    Amerloque 20100829 12h00 Paris time (CET)

    x x x x x

    Best,
    L’Amerloque

  46. fenbeagle says:

    Locusts
    That was a particularly stupid Arctic wolf, not representative of the canine specious as a whole. Only a human could believe it stepped out onto that small piece of ice in the hope that, despite appearances, it might contain lunch and be perfectly safe.
    They should re montage it, with a western family searching for a MacDonalds outlet, and unfortunately now desperately stranded.

  47. izen says:

    Rare Earth…

    Lithium for modern battery technology is well known, but other light and heavy ‘rare Earth’ metals are crucial for high strength magnets for electric motors and generators, phosphors for screens and several other electronic components.

    while they are called ‘rare’ a better charaterisation would be ‘dilute’. In any metal ore these elements will be present, but in such small concentrations that extracting the metals is expensive and difficult.
    The problem is not that the rare Earths are approaching any sort of finite limit, but that the extraction of what is available is getting expensive and that will drive up the price of many hi-tech components. Including many items that are part of the ‘Green’ low carbon economy like electric motors for hybrid/electric cars and wind turbine generators.

    China has dominated the market in rare Earths for the last decade or so. But have just announced a new policy of drastically reducing exports of these key materials. In fact the reduction in exports is around 70%.

    “Shipments will be capped at 7,976 metric tons, down from 28,417 tons for the same period a year ago, according to data from the Ministry of Commerce yesterday. ” –
    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2010-07-09/china-reduces-rare-earth-export-quota-by-72-in-second-half-lynas-says.html

    In this earlier report of this change in policy the Chinese officials commenting on this seem to be quite candid about the reasons.
    “They adjusted the policy to ensure that the resources are optimally utilized.”
    “China needs to restrict exports and production because domestic supplies won’t be enough to meet its own needs, the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology said in September. ”

    However in more recent reports the ‘spin’ on the Chinese decision to keep/hoard/conserve the rare Earth metals for its own manufacturing efforts and block exports has been given a rather different explanation….

    http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/90001/90776/90884/7121141.html
    “China’s restrictions on rare earth industry will assist in protecting the environment, Chinese Commerce Minister Chen Deming said on Saturday.
    “Mass-extraction of rare earth will cause great damage to the environment, that’s why China has tightened controls over rare earth production, exploration and trade, ” Chen told media during the third China-Japan high-level economic dialogue.
    ———

    Recent articles here about how the Chinese may see the Western concern over AGW as a means of constraining economic development.
    But here it would appear China is using the same sort of spurious justification for an economic attack on the West by constraining the availability of rare Earth and quoting ‘environmental damage’ as the reason.

    For the host and Australian posters here, this little matter is of special relevance because exports from China which up to now has controlled over 90% of the rare Earth market. Australia is the next most convenient source for these strategic metals, and there are already proposals, probably real and scams, to mine more rare Earths to address the shortfall from Chinese sources.

    Any rare Earth ores at Pilbaru?!

  48. suffolkboy says:

    @izen re rare earrths.
    Yes I see Europium is one dollar a gram[1] or more. But if we start digging up Australia, building bridges over pointy stones where necessary, the Chinese will simply drop their price and make it uneconomic. Perhaps we can start mining the old CRT monitors and television tubes we threw away last year, if we can remember which mineshafts we dropped them down.

    [1] http://www.stanfordmaterials.com/eu.html

  49. suffolkboy says:

    These neodymium magnets are frisky blighters. I put a steel retort stand on a lab bench last year, not realising there was a tiny magnet under a piece of paper about a foot away. I put a glass Petri dish on the retort stand, and probably moved it slightly. The magnet careered into the retort stand, smashing through the Petri dish.

    I want to levitate a frog one day[1], but it needs a few thousand amps and gallons of running water rather than rare earths.
    [1] http://www.ru.nl/hfml/research/levitation/diamagnetic/

  50. Locusts says:

    Fenbeagle,

    My first feeling that it was a mammal that emits cold instead of heat. He dozed off, and the entire ice floe melted around him, but luckily owing to his adaptive qualities, his makeshift bed maintained it’s form.

    Izen,

    Makes you think doesn’t it? There was a muted uproar about this issue last year.

  51. suffolkboy says:

    I am confused. If this tree is the most influential tree in the world, why is it vertical? I thought it had been chopped down and had had its rings measured and would have been invaded by Arctic Termites and turned into methane by now? So it this (i) Photoshopped (ii) another tree in the Yamal used to make a fun picture (iii) any old tree in Australia or the rest of the world (iv) genuine (v) none of the above?

    And what’s this one?

  52. manonthemoor says:

    Just a reminder for UK R4 listeners summary by Radio Times

    Uncertain Climate

    Monday 30 August
    9:00am – 9:30am
    BBC Radio 4

    1/2

    Roger Harrabin has reported on the climate for almost 30 years, but last November, when he worked on the ‘Climategate’ story, he started to have doubts about the real science of climate change. Public trust in climate science looked assured as nations moved towards the climate summit in Copenhagen, but apparently now less than half of the British population accepts that humans are responsible for changing the climate – the fundamental premise of many Government policies. What happened to cause this swing in public sentiment? At this crucial moment in global climate policy-making, Harrabin talks to seminal figures in the climate change debate including Tony Blair, Nigel Lawson, Crispin Tickell and Steve McIntyre.

  53. fenbeagle says:

    Suffolkboy
    ‘Dunno, but I bet there’s a squirrel up there somewhere.

  54. izen says:

    @-suffolkboy says:
    August 29, 2010 at 10:03 pm
    “I am confused. If this tree is the most influential tree in the world, why is it vertical? I thought it had been chopped down and had had its rings measured ….”

    Sample cores….

    http://web.utk.edu/~grissino/archtools.htm

  55. suffolkboy says:

    @izen http://web.utk.edu/~grissino/archtools.htm
    Curses, Izen! You’ve ruined my fantasy about Norfolk students in lumberjack kit wandering around Siberia with an axe. Clearly the Minnesotans have been pulling my leg[1], even in their new edition.

    I don’t think squirrels would be much use. But perhaps we could train woodpeckers.

  56. CriticalThinker says:

    Speaking of batteries and frogs, I wonder how many frogs this baby could levitate?

    http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2010-04/texas-town-turns-monster-battery-backup-power

  57. suffolkboy says:

    CriticalThinker said at August 30, 2010 at 5:50 am: I wonder how many frogs this baby could levitate?
    Reading the article, and especially the comments about power outages, reminded me. We had a power outage over much of Suffolk some fifteen years ago lasting about six hours. The cause: a squirrel in a major switching centre where all the power from the one nuclear power station and one of the two incoming links from the rest of the country converge. No shortage of incoming power, just barbecued squirrel over a BIG SWITCH. Hope they remember to keep the Presidio battery charged and free of rodents.

  58. manonthemoor says:

    This IPCC review courtesy TUB on JD

    http://reviewipcc.interacademycouncil.net/IACReportRelease.html

    Live broadcast !!! 10.00 am Monday 30th Aug …….. EDT (USA)

    Ban Ki-moon and Pachauri are featuring !!!!

  59. suffolkboy says:

    @manonthemoor said on August 30, 2010 at 7:02 am: The Great Collapse of the Chicago Climate Exchange. Does this mean that the ECX will follow soon after? I don’t do big money.
    http://www.ecx.eu/

  60. mlpinaus says:

    manonthemoor says:
    August 30, 2010 at 7:02 am
    Latest carbon exchange news…

    Thanks for the link. I’ll forward it to the boy, and thus to his mates. Adelaide’s newspapers are so…. poor, this sort of information is unheard of. Thanks.
    Marcus

  61. Amerloque says:

    Hello Everyone !

    The West is being thirdworlded a little bit more every day … (sigh)

    From the Wall Street Journal this morning (Monday):

    /// AUGUST 28, 2010

    In Toledo, the ‘Glass City,’ New Label: Made in China

    By JAMES T. AREDDY

    The Toledo Museum of Art’s $30 million Glass Pavilion is a symbol of America’s “Glass City,” and reflects the legacy of its local glassmakers.

    A smudge on the image: The pavilion glass was imported from China, the new global powerhouse of the glass industry.

    No one in the U.S. had the capability to satisfy cutting-edge architectural specifications for the curving pavilion, even though the 2006 job involved techniques advanced decades ago by Toledo inventors: bending and laminating glass. The pavilion features 360 thick glass panels, each up to 13.5 feet tall, eight feet wide and weighing over 1,300 pounds.

    For years, the West focused on the threat from China’s low-tech exporters like clothing and furniture makers. Glass represents how an even more potent challenge has arrived: sophisticated, capital-intensive businesses that boast high-tech expertise.
    In industries where global demand has shifted to China, the pattern is repeated, from steel to locomotives and turbines to specialized glassworks. Chinese companies that have gorged on growth in the domestic market have managed in just a few years to close the gap on decades of technological innovation in the industrialized West. … ///

    (NB: he Wall Street Journal (wsj.com) is accessed by paid subscription … one workaround is to go to the Google “News” page and search for, say, “China glass”. The resultant link to the WSJ can be clicked on with no problem – for a while, anyway.)

    Best,
    L’Amerloque

    Amerloque 20100830 09h00 Paris time (CET)

  62. manonthemoor says:

    Someone agrees with rastech over thorium

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/comment/7970619/Obama-could-kill-fossil-fuels-overnight-with-a-nuclear-dash-for-thorium.html

    It seems its already political since France and Uk are already too heavily invested in next generation uranium, where as the USA, Russia and China could grasp the nettle.

    The best hope yet to kill AGW scam, but the carbon investments re going to get hurt!

  63. Amazing work, Febeagle, sir. Far above the commercial standard, as is typical for this blogspace in both prose, image and poetry. This “paper” could have competed during the Fleet Street halcyon years of 1885-1917. 1917 was when the press went left and out of the quality business.

    Here is other nice work forthcoming, again from Canada, the technological Vimy Ridge sods (with thanks to General Byng, or course, and Gen. Plumer and Gen. Andy MacNaughton).

    http://www.carbonmanagement.ca/assets/files/CMC%20Call%20for%20Proposals%202010-08-06.pdf

    Also see http://www.draxgroup.plc.uk for the way forward. Fix bayonets, one leg on the ladder, and wait for the whistle, lads and laddesses. I have a hot date in Belleau Wood.

  64. Go for ad’s if you can post them, Ozboy. The agencies should know the ropes on that. WordPress would be ecstatic to debut with that option with your site.

  65. Old Toad says:

    James has just posted his ‘take’ on Sir Crispin Tickell’s (sorry that should read) Roger Harrabin’s ‘Uncertain Climate’ programme on BBC.
    A few friends of the Beeb must have been on hand to decry it instantly, whilst Guardian Climate Change respondents have been given the day off, while that organ discusses ‘Liberal Guilt’.
    After all how can a mere Oxford English graduate like James hope to compete with the great scientific minds of the day like Gore, Blair, Brown and John Prescott ?

  66. Amerloque says:

    Why was this comment removed FOUR TIMES on JD’s new thread, the one about the BBC being balanced ?

    x x x x
    AGW, aka “manmade global warming”, is a scientific, intellectual, political, financial and moral scam. The climate has been changing for millions upon millions of years.

    The IPCC is the biggest perpetrator of scientific fraud that the world has ever seen.

    Individuals and organizations involved in this fraud should be prosecuted to the full extent of the law.

    Civil suits should be filed to recover grant money and subsidies given to individuals and organizations participating in the fraud.

    Now is not the time to let up ! ! !

    x x x x

  67. suffolkboy says:

    As acting God Emperor for the day I am ordering all mobile troops not suffering from RSI over to the JD Harrabin thread. Anybody on sick leave should get up-to-date on the SPPI position ( http://scienceandpublicpolicy.org/ ) as I would expect considerable tyrollean blog attack or more substantive mud-slinging against it after its latest publication.

    Anyone with time on their hands will explore http://www.cla.org.uk/ and send me a report on How To Make Lots of Money Out of Desolate Wilderness which Might Have Windy Days.

    Cpl Izen, I need your homework on “Adiabatic lapse rate in perfectly transparent gases and its relevance to the so-called greenhouse effect” to be handed in by first day of new term, Sep 2010.

    Pt Ansen, how much energy do we need to raise the average temperature of all the oceans by one degree?

    Suffolkboy (Duty Acting God Emperor)

  68. suffolkboy says:

    IPCC report on how to do reports better is out.
    http://reviewipcc.interacademycouncil.net/report.html

  69. suffolkboy says:

    So is one possibility is that the IPCC will in future arrive at reports by internal Wiki-style “peer review”(!) in which the most wiki-savvy reviewers will be able to control the outcome?

  70. meltemian says:

    Yes Sir, Suffolk-God-Emperor..

  71. Amerloque says:

    Hi Big Growly Bear !

    A French family member has just returned from a trip to the Tetons , Jackson, and Yellowstone. She said that this is the latest info for European tourists who love bears.

    Would you be kind enough to confirm that it is a similar situation in your neck of the woods, please ?

    Many thanks !

    Best,
    L’Amerloque
    Amerloque 20100830 18h04 Paris time (CET)
    _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

    Some precautions to follow when in bear country:

    1. Carry powerful pepper spray to defend yourself.

    2. Wear several little bells attached to your backpack and walking stick, so they hear you coming and are not startled.

    3. Know how to identify bear droppings to know that the bears are around:

    —3a. Black bear droppings usually contain berry seeds and squirrel fur.

    —3b. Grizzly droppings smell like pepper spray and contain little bells.

    _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

    (grin) Our friends from Oz can now see what squirrels are useful for !

  72. meltemian says:

    I’ve just spent ages trying to get the UN Press Conference to play!!!!!!!
    No Luck, apparently I have to download RealPlayer so I did that. Now it won’t play either unless I download it for about 4 hours OR pay 19.99 to get a fast download. I have given up – anyone managed it?

  73. Amerloque says:

    Hi Melt !

    Apparently the “BBC player” is unavailable for us outside the UK: at least, that’s what the message on screen says every time.

    Are you attempting to dl from the UN site ?

    Best,
    L’Amerloque

  74. manonthemoor says:

    meltemian
    August 31, 2010 at 2:33 am

    Hi meltemian

    Running Opera I also had to download RealPlayer apart from th options tou noticed there is a simple free option, download this one and all should work ok

    It did for me, the prog content is interesting as a measure of the personalities involved their attitudes and the contributions of the audience.

    Worth to time to get it working

    Hope this helps

    I believe there is a link to watch the rerun

  75. fenbeagle says:

    Suffolkboy
    Good god! If the South folk now have an Emperor, where exactly do they intend to get an empire from?

  76. manonthemoor says:

    Just watched BBC 6 o’clock news

    Roger Harrabin say’s he expects Pachauri to resign following the IAC report.

    Watching his body language I got no indication of this, perhaps Roger has some privileged information?

  77. meltemian says:

    @Amerloque – Yes it was the UN site.

    MOTM – Thanks I’ll try again when I’ve finished cooking dinner. Mr M is getting peevish!!

  78. suffolkboy says:

    fenbeagle says: August 31, 2010 at 3:09 am
    I’m afraid the anointing oil from JD evaporates twenty four hours after about 15:45BST Monday, which takes me to about tea-time Tuesday.

  79. suffolkboy says:

    Repost: Don’t forget the RGS on Thursday with Professor Mike Hulme.
    [1] http://www.rgs.org/NR/rdonlyres/2FDAE98D-7D62-448F-B3AC-DC7D68F11FF9/0/AC2010ProgrammeBookv7lowres.pdf

    Source:

  80. suffolkboy says:

    Perhaps the IAC report is a bone thrown out of the sledge to keep the sceptic wolves distracted from attacking the sledge (“yes, we can do reports better, OK, now get away”). But I don’t think it will work. Even if Pachauri goes (“OK, OK, the bone trick didn’t work, have a whole carcass, now just go away, will you”) the whole high-momentum sledge is so massive and well-stocked with wolf fodder and credit cards it could keep going for years. This is getting serious.

  81. Pointman says:

    Hello all,

    Pachuri has to stay! He’s a great Albatross around the neck of the IPCC.

    Pointman

    Nor dim nor red
    Like God’s own head
    The glorious Sun uprist
    And all averred I’d killed the bird
    that brought the fog and mist

  82. Edward. says:

    Oz,

    Something rum this way comes to Aus’.

    ” The ACT Government today announced a target of CO2 emissions reduction of 40 per cent by 2020 (compared to 1990 levels). That is, in 2008 CO2 emissions were estimated at 1.2 Mt in the ACT. The “business as usual” estimate is 1.62 Mt in 2020 (a 40 per cent increase over 1990 levels). The ACT Government’s target is now 0.695 Mt in 2020 (a 40 per cent reduction on 1990 levels).

    Compared to “business as usual” this means a reduction of 58 per cent in 2020.”

    http://joannenova.com.au/2010/08/canberra-the-act-will-cut-emissions-by-40-by-2020/

    Blimey, that’s a lot of cuts.

    Ed.

    Cut government in half. Chuck ’em all out of Canberra: a city, like Washington D.C., whose only industry is federal government (well, mail-order porn too I guess). That will meet the emissions target nicely, and keep the watermelons happy.

    Won’t it?

    Oz 😉

  83. Pointman says:

    Edward. says:
    August 31, 2010 at 9:38 am

    “By the pricking of my thumbs … ”

    Pointman

  84. JD is back and the trolls are out and about and the mods are removing comments like crazy funny that so much for light moderating.

  85. Amanda says:

    G’day one and all (or y’all for short).

    I’m posting this here if you don’t mind, in case it gets deleted from JD’s blog, which it probably will:

    Golly, gang, something new from the ever-entertaining moderators: one of BNPwants-to-steal-my-passport’s comments is missing with this intriguing line in its place:

    This comment was flagged for review

    Flagged for review! Does that mean that the Witan of the Telegraph will be pondering it in the AM over donuts and coffee? Will it be sent to the Archbishop of Canterbury and the top Imam of Walthamstow to make sure it’s kosher? (Yes, that’s a joke. Moderators can spot a joke, can they not?)

    What happened? Did someone report it but the mod involved was too fagged and wanted to go home for the night so passed the buck for the moment and left ‘flagged for review’ in the meantime? I mean, is it the metaphorical equivalent of ‘back in five minutes’? Or is the Grand High Council of Godly Bodly Mods chewing over the philosophical implications of Passporty’s latest jukebox selection? Report Reply
    Edit

  86. realityreturns says:

    Would you alll believe that I had the commet below removed by the moderators on JD’s blog……what sensitive little barstewards they are. Amandas comment was removed too. Nothing like hyper-sensitive mods is there??

    Hi AmandaThere are a number of suspicions about ruari (in its different guises) having a cosy relationship with a moderator…….we shall see.

  87. manonthemoor says:

    UK Daily Express Front Page headline take on the IAC report

    http://www.dailyexpress.co.uk/posts/view/196642

    No doubt this means the Express, part of the MSM is pulling another brick out of the AGW wall to educate Joe Public.

    Such headlines can only be good for the exposure of the AGW scam.

    IS the MSM worm now finally beginning to turn?

  88. Amerloque says:

    Hi All !

    Here’s what Amerloque thinks is an, er, interesting comment, pulled from the comments section concerning the report on the IPCC this morning ‘Tuesday) in the Wall Street Journal:

    x x x x x

    Is global warming caused by carbon dioxide? Blame the EPA.

    Starting back in 1975 EPA regulations required catalytic converters on motor vehicle exhaust systems. Guess what, catalytic converters oxidize carbon monoxide into carbon dioxide, and unburnt hydrocarbons (fuel) to carbon dioxide and water. Now they want to tax us via Cap and Trade.

    Similar to municipal drinking water: they have a monopoly, but still turn out bad water. People instead drink bottled water. Now they want to tax plastic bottles.

    Pattern repeats with Fannie and Freddie: they require banks to make risky loans — backed by the Fed, then when the t-paper fails they blame Wall Street, and then bailout friends with taxpayer money. For laughs see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iW5qKYfqALE

    Back to global warming. The weather changes day to day, week to week, decade to decade, and century to century, etc… Since recorded history there have been droughts, famines, plagues, volcanoes, earthquakes, and yes, hot and cold weather. One of the coldest winters on record in Europe this year – at times too cold to even de-ice passenger jets. Huge cloud of ash and horrible greenhouse gasses thrown up by an Icelandic volcano covered most of Europe and shuts down air travel for many days. The random intervention of nature trumps even politics, it seems.

    Perhaps the problem with the climate is more of a problem with our ability to reason within the context of geologic time.

    x x x x x

    Best,
    L’Amerloque
    Amerloque 20100831 10h12 Paris time (CET)

  89. Edward. says:

    Pointman says:
    August 31, 2010 at 9:51 am

    Dear God, the power of Shakespeare, if ever one needs any reminding of the power of words, then simply delve into the world of a wordsmith – whose like will never be known again.
    A propagandist, he certainly did a ‘number’ on Richard the last Plantagenet king.
    Perhaps the world’s greatest spinmeister?

    “Into this breathing world, scarce half made up,
    And that so lamely and unfashionable
    That dogs bark at me as I halt by them;”

    Would that he (Shakespeare) were now on our side, the battle would soon be won.

    Dream on, it will have to be the ‘broadsword’ and not the words, though words are our Broad ally – more especially if one inhabits the North:>)

    @Ozboy,

    “Cut government in half. Chuck ‘em all out of Canberra: a city, like Washington D.C., whose only industry is federal government (well, mail-order porn too I guess). That will meet the emissions target nicely, and keep the watermelons happy.”

    Well said sir!

    Ed.

  90. izen says:

    @-suffolkboy says:
    August 31, 2010 at 12:58 am
    “Cpl Izen, I need your homework on “Adiabatic lapse rate in perfectly transparent gases and its relevance to the so-called greenhouse effect” to be handed in by first day of new term, Sep 2010.”

    The adiabatic lapse rate for a perfect gas, is proportional to the gravitational force divided by the specific heat capacity of the gas.
    The relevance of this for the ‘greenhouse’ effect of an atmosphere is that because the temperature decreases as the pressure drops with altitude without any input or output of energy the rate of energy loss from higher altitude layers of the atmosphere is lower because of the lower temperature DESPITE the constant energy content. This is a consequence of the Stefan-Boltzmann result of rate of energy loss = Temp^4

    NASA covers this and other basic atmospheric science here –
    http://atmos.nmsu.edu/education_and_outreach/encyclopedia/adiabatic_lapse_rate.htm

  91. izen says:

    @-Amerloque says:
    August 31, 2010 at 12:05 am
    “Why was this comment removed FOUR TIMES on JD’s new thread, the one about the BBC being balanced ?”

    As so often the clue to the answer is in the question.
    You have posted the passage before, repeatedly, with no change in syntax of format. And now have tried to post it FOUR TIMES on one thread. To any automated spam filter that repetition looks like spam.

    Lets take a look at WHAT you are posting, it is clearly a bit of text you have saved and just cut-n-paste into many of your postings, I am sure we have all seen it before, but here it is in a ‘warmist version ….

    x x x x
    AGW, aka “manmade global warming”, is THE scientific, intellectual, political, financial and moral problem facing human society. The climate has been changing for millions upon millions of years, but recent changes are exceptional in human history.
    The IPCC is the biggest source of scientific assessment and information that the world has ever seen.
    Individuals and organizations involved in this resource should be supported to the full extent of our ability.
    Civil suits should be filed to enable grant money and subsidies given to individuals and organizations participating in the research, amelioration and adaption to AGW.
    Now is not the time to let up ! ! !
    x x x x

    If a poster (like bje?) routinely posted THIS version of your post without any attempt to justify its bald assertions or engage with those that disagree with its unreflective certainty I suspect you would criticize the repetition and lack of rigour or scientific integrity in its apparently mindless dogmatic re-iteration.

    By the way, if you were the author of that pastiche of one of my posts with the -(big grins)-
    then I am immensely flattered….
    -sardonic smirk-…….

  92. RR the mods are up to their old tricks again, may they all catch STD’s from the obviously unhealthy lifestyle they lead.

  93. NoIdea says:

    Izen August 27, 2010 at 8:17 pm on the previous thread.

    Perhaps I was being a little generous in my estimation that you would know which BF I was referring to when I replied to your post that included the wonderful…

    “50,000 feet is around the altitude that Nitrogen gets converted to Carbon14.”

    Or, perhaps you did get the reference and that is why you are ignoring me?

    NoIdea

  94. suffolkboy says:

    @izen izen said at August 31, 2010 at 11:52 pm

    Excellent start. So
    (i) if I suddenly by magic I turned the Sun off NOW (zero radiation incoming to the Earth), what would the temperature difference be between say 40,000 ft altitude and sea level on the Earth a second later? Tomorrow? Next year? (Roughly).
    (ii) What would you tell Year 7 (11 year-olds) next week if they were to ask you why it is warmer at the Earth’s surface than at 40,000 ft?
    (iii) As (ii) but Year 11 (about to leave school)
    (iv) As (ii) but Year 13 (about to go to university)
    (v) As (ii) but your MP (trying to keep their seat)
    (vi) By some means, a planet like the Earth but which has an atmosphere similar to the Earth is floating in space with no nearby star has at some instant a temperature near the surface of 20 deg C. What is its temperature at 40,000 ft? What information would I need to know in order to estimate its rate of thermal radiation to space?

  95. suffolkboy says:

    Have we all seen
    Lord Monckton’s video[1]?
    It’s entitled: Monckton Responds to Abraham. It is the first (?) of lots of clips from this talk.

    [1]

  96. NoIdea says:

    Suffolkboy

    Many thanks for the link to Monckton Responds to Abraham.
    I had been waiting for it and not noticed it.
    I have to admit to not watching all of the original Abraham thing.
    I found the sound of Abrahams voice to be too obnoxious to bother with it.
    Will Abraham do a response to Monckton’s response?

    NoIdea

  97. Amerloque says:

    — >> izen says:
    On September 1, 2010 at 12:21 am

    Sir/Madam:

    I have no desire to enter into any correspondence with you. Had you not noticed that I have never posted to you? Do you think it’s by accident ? Are you so self centered ?

    This is the one and only time I shall be addressing you directly.

    I find your tiresome and repetitive brayings shallowly reasoned and insufficiently documented. You, like so many, prefer to cut and paste rather than reason on your own, preferring to avoid risk rather than moving forward with vigor.

    I find that your thinking ability – such that you have demonstrated it here – is on the level of a 12-year old about to begin “high school”. It’s simply an unpolished, puerile veneer which might impress some people – doting parents, say, or a lonely grandmother out in the countryside, or a maiden aunt – but in the real world it is sadly insufficient.

    Your writings and “research” are probably enough to convince some people (perhaps those paying for your “education” ?) that you have been trained in “logic” and “science”, but they fall sadly, abysmally, and irrevocably short of such an evaluation on my part.

    On the other hand, what can one expect when “good grades” and “degrees” are being handed out like candy to all and sundry while disregarding intelligence, aptitude and skill – not to mention common sense and decency ?

    So, to cases:

    ———————————————–
    (Start Izen)

    @-Amerloque says:
    August 31, 2010 at 12:05 am
    “Why was this comment removed FOUR TIMES on JD’s new thread, the one about the BBC being balanced ?”

    As so often the clue to the answer is in the question.
    You have posted the passage before, repeatedly, with no change in syntax of format.

    And now have tried to post it FOUR TIMES on one thread.

    (Stop Izen)

    ———————————————–

    It was posted once.

    It was removed by a “moderator”.

    It was then reposted again.

    It was again removed by a moderator.

    It was posted a third time.

    It was removed by a moderator for the third time.

    It was posted a fourth time.

    It was then removed by a moderator for the fourth time.

    It was not always posted in the same place. It was not posted from the same IP.

    Hence the message.

    Is that clear ? Can you follow the sequence ? Are you sure ? Are you up to speed on this ? Not too complex for you ?

    ———————————————–
    (Start Izen)

    To any automated spam filter that repetition looks like spam.

    (Stop Izen)

    ———————————————–

    Did it ever occur to you that it might not necessarily be a “spam filter”. Do you know anything about lateral thinking ? Does the name “Edward De Bono” ring a bell ?

    You are not the first to make such an assumption, by the way. Recently on the DT blog, a similar observation was made. I reproduce here the original comment in toto and my response:

    _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

    (begin similar observation in toto)

    Hi !

    /// Whilst I agree entirely with your assessment amerloque, do you really need to post this reply to every single AGW / Climate Change article?

    Yes, it is a snappy statement, especially the opening line. Well done you.

    Now, any chance you could move on please? ///
    (end similar observation)

    (begin Amerloque’s answer in toto)

    Thanks for your comment !

    Actually, it’s not a ‘reply’ at all: it’s a call to action. Sometimes it’s used to refocus the debates when they lose their import (e.g., visits from ‘trolls’ and suchlike …).

    If one assumes that only the very same people read each thread, one is probably making an invalid assumption, in Amerloque’s view, since there are new visitors every day to this site and its allies. Newbies, people wondering what this AGW stuff is all about. They haven’t read the message yet. It might have moved off the page into Disqus oblivion. (grin)

    One particular post (about AGW and the Chinese) recently went from a couple of thousand Google hits on day one to something over 2,000,000 within a few days. No idea how many today, though.

    Amerloque learned very, very early (1963, as a matter of fact) that when waging a war of ideas and cherrypicked facts, it is crucial to stay on message ! Every time. (grin)

    Hopefully this clears up any misunderstanding.

    Best,
    L’Amerloque
    (end Amerloque’s answer)
    _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

    What of course happened was a moderator thought it politic to kill the massage yet again. Other Amerloque messages were removed as well.

    Amerloque then posted another message:

    /// To whom it may concern:

    Today, August 27, 2010, many of my messages in this thread have been removed by “moderators”.

    It should be made clear that two of these messages were ones that I have been posting irregularly since last year, before Copenhagen, and are simple, polite calls to action: “Now is not the time to let up.”

    In no way can they be considered ‘insults’, or ‘spam’ or ‘disturbing’ posts. They are in full compliance with DT blog guidelines.

    When other posters attempted to rectify the situation by reposting the message(s), those posts were removed as well.

    Since I have neither the time nor the desire to “complain” to the so-called “moderators” or to their supervisors, I have decided to forward all this to my UK solicitor, who is paid to write letters to people quite a bit higher on corporate ladders. This course of action has been quite worthwhile in many fields over the past four decades.

    Needless to say, I – nor any institutions or groups of which I am a member – will most assuredly not be purchasing from DT advertisers in future.

    Best to All !
    L’Amerloque ///

    I also posted it as a reply to a reply by JD.

    One day later or so, Christopher Booker came out with an article called
    “The Clean Development Mechanism delivers the greatest green scam of all
    Even the UN and the EU are wising up to the greenhouse gas scam, “the biggest environmental scandal in history”, says Christopher Booker.”

    in which he used language in the title and text in far more incendiary a fashion than Amerloque’s call to action, in Amerloque’s view.

    Perhaps CB was astute enough to know that solicitors are simply unnecessary and that a moderator was probably exceeding his or her brief.

    Perhaps JD tipped him off and said “Write us a humdinger to defuse the situation !”

    Perhaps CB and JD (and others writing the DT blogs) don’t appreciate the “modrators”.

    Perhaps someone corporate upstairs had no desire to receive “solicitor mail” for what, after all, in simply a difference of opinion about vocabulary.

    Perhaps those same powers-that-be have had quite enough of solicitors, too, after rabid insults were recently, just before election time, hurled at politicians and unprovable accusations publicly made against elected and appointed individuals and other identifiable public figures. Libel and slander lawsuits are expensive in the UK.

    Now, is that clear ? Can you follow the sequence ? Are you sure ? Are you up to speed on this ? Not too complex for you ?

    _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

    (Start Izen)

    By the way, if you were the author of that pastiche of one of my posts with the -(big grins)- then I am immensely flattered….
    -sardonic smirk-…….

    (Stop Izen)
    _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

    Amerloque travelled quite a bit with his father in the 1950s. As a child, he was able to benefit from the wisdom of many, many people. In Saudi Arabia (well before OPEC) , a man told him:

    “Allah gave man two ears and one mouth so that he would listen twice as much as he talked.”

    With pleasure – because he agrees with the substance – Amerloque has remembered the sentence since then.

    Amerloque even used it as an opening line on his very first BBS in the late 1980s. It did wonders for discouraging trolls, as a matter of fact. It might even have helped posters to think a teensy-weensy, itty-bitty more before writing – and revealing their ignorance, incompetence and self-centeredness.

    Best,
    L’Amerloque

    Amerloque 20100831 18h50 Paris time (CET)

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